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April 13th, 2015

HealthcareIT_Apr13_AAdvancements in medical technology allow doctors to provide better treatment and diagnosis to their patients. From electronic medical records to mobile devices, patients and physicians are reaping benefits from these new technologies. Additionally, a growing number of healthcare institutions are implementing Google Glass in their medical operations. Google Glass wasn’t originally designed for medical use, but many of its features allow for more efficient medical services.

What is Google Glass?

Google Glass is essentially a wearable computer with an optical head-mounted display. Glass has a small prism-like screen in the upper corner of the frame, which allows users to see and interact with information using a voice command system. Google Glass has a wide range of applications available to empower its functionality.

How Google Glass revolutionizes healthcare

Glass allows medical professionals to select and install healthcare applications. These applications are specially designed for medical usage, whether it’s to enable real-time access to patient information or to stream live video for educational purposes. Here are five ways Google Glass can enhance healthcare.
  • EMS communication - During emergency patient transportation, Google Glass provides a connection between EMS ambulance staff and the emergency department team at a hospital. Glass allows paramedics to stream live images and videos from the ambulance to awaiting emergency room doctors, who can view the patient’s injury before arrival. Doctors are able to give initial treatment advice to paramedics. They can also prepare resources such as the operating room and medical equipment, in order to start treatment as soon as the patient arrives.
  • Virtual dictation - According to a survey, doctors typically spend a third of their day on the computer, either to input or retrieve patients’ electronic medical records. Augmedix, a Google Glass application, eliminates these time-consuming processes and allows doctors to gain access to real-time patient data without being tethered to a computer. Doctors can communicate with their patients while browsing data via Glass by using simple voice commands.
  • Patient care instruction - Every patient has different symptoms and medical needs. Healthcare staff with Glass can provide better treatment by viewing a patient’s medical records, what their families have had to say during medical consultations, and instructions from doctors. These recorded instructions ensure a patient’s safety, even if they are unable to recall their own care instructions.
  • Procedure analysis - When it comes to medical services, it is simply not acceptable for patients to be negatively impacted by an error in the healthcare system. Google Glass enables medical staff to review emergency and operation procedures for training purposes. This improves accuracy for future procedures and also reduces the margin for error.
  • Medical training assistance - Glass can literally walk medical students through surgical procedures. Doctors wearing Google Glass can project real-time visibility during surgical operations, giving the perfect point of view for observers. Glass can also record videos for future reference. This gives medical students or trainee staff far better insight into the whole procedure, rather than trying to view it from around a crowded operating table.
Google Glass is here to stay in the healthcare industry. If you want to learn how to implement wearable technology in your medical practice or hospital, give us a call today.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

March 16th, 2015

HealthcareIT_Mar16_AMedical institutions rely on their healthcare systems to facilitate the needs of their patients, whether through electronic medical records, prescription management or data entry software. Unfortunately, most healthcare service providers don’t realize how vulnerable their IT systems are to cyber attacks. One of the contributing factors to data breach is digitization. While there are several benefits of converting medical data from paper records into electronic files, there is no denying that it increases the risk of data theft. And since stolen healthcare information can be used to commit identity theft and financial crimes, securing healthcare data has become more important than ever.

According to healthcare security experts, healthcare data breaches are on the rise due to the high prices the data can command on the black market.

From financial information to medical information

In the past few years, cybercriminals’ focus has been on stealing financial data, including credit card numbers and personal information. But things are taking a turn, the result of financial institutions fortifying their database and raising client awareness of the problem. This is making it more difficult for hackers to steal financial data, let alone use them. Banks do their bit to protect their customers, too, by quickly identifying and canceling compromised credit cards.

Stronger data protection measures have forced criminals to turn their attention to medical data, which is typically much less secure. Patient data includes an individual’s date of birth, medical and physical records and social security number - information that can’t be easily reset, and that is significantly more valuable than credit card data.

Securing healthcare data

Healthcare data has become more attractive to criminals, and it’s crucial that medical institutions take necessary precautions to secure their patients’ information from data thieves. Here are some best practice measures to secure healthcare data.
  • Protect the network and Wi-Fi - As hackers use a variety of tools to break into IT systems and obtain medical records, healthcare organizations need to invest in secure firewalls and antivirus software to deploy on their healthcare devices. Network segregation is also a wise move so that, in the event that a breach does occur, the attacker can’t instantly access all of your organization’s information at once.
  • Educate employees - Staff members need to receive lessons about information security, including setting passwords, spam filters, protection against phishing, and other kinds of data breach methods.
  • Data encryption - Encrypting data is one of the safest ways to secure it. Healthcare institutions can encode patients information in such a way that only authorized users can access it. Multi encryption is also an effective way to keep out intruders.
  • Physical security - Most healthcare institutions still retain their patients’ records on paper, stored in cabinets. Ensure that all loopholes are covered by installing surveillance cameras and other physical security controls, such as electronic door locks.
It is of crucial importance for healthcare providers to secure sensitive information, in order to gain and retain the trust of your patients. If you want to know how your organization can better protect your patients information, give us a call.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

March 3rd, 2015

Financial analysis concept 1Healthcare organizations have an extremely dynamic work environment - doctors, nurses, staff and patients are constantly on the move. In spite of all the stress and pressure, the organization must do its best to lower costs while trying to improve patient satisfaction and safety. This is why healthcare administrators are increasingly relying on wireless technology to facilitate their patients and operate more efficiently. Here are some examples of how wireless technology is providing new solutions to healthcare businesses.

Managing staff workflow

Working in a hospital can be an exhausting experience, in a stressful environment and under time pressure. This can affect staff performance in delivering service to patients. You can track staff movements, to gain a better understanding of workflow, by deploying ID badges with a radio frequency identification (RFID) tag that can be linked up to the hospital’s Internet connection. The badges will then collect data and it can be analyzed for possible improvements to processes.

Better inventory of medical equipment

Sometimes it’s hard to keep track of medical equipment and devices in storage. Wireless RFID technology allows users to track not only the location of the equipment, but also its condition and status. This way it’s easy to tell at a glance whether the equipment is in use or not. RFID also prevents staff from spending hours searching for missing tools, so doctors and nurses can focus on caring for patients. Simply put, you’ll always find the equipment you need, in the right place and at the right time.

Increasing security

Wireless technology can be used in different ways to boost security. For instance, attaching an electronic tag to an infant can help prevent child abduction from hospitals. Another way to implement this is to let staff wear ID badges embedded with a RFID tag. Whenever a member of staff enters a patient’s room, his or her name, photo, and job function will display on the patient’s bedside monitor. This allows the patient to quickly identify the members of the team responsible for their care. The patient’s family will also be able to find out who has visited the patient and when.

Accessing and analyzing data

Healthcare organizations are increasingly turning to cloud-based data storage. And when wireless signal devices are installed around the hospital, the data will be available to all staff in the area. Many healthcare organizations are also adopting analytical software to perform data mining - a process in which data is analyzed to provide new information and deeper insight into operations.

Automating environmental monitoring

There are many cases in hospitals where the environment needs to be monitored closely. For instance, hospitals usually have a number of refrigerators spread across the site that are used to store vaccines, medicines, or even tissue samples, and which must be kept at a carefully controlled temperature. Equally, hospitals often have to maintain appropriate humidity levels within certain rooms. This is where wireless technology can help. By attaching sensors to wireless RFID tags that can send the room’s temperature and humidity information over a Wi-Fi connection, staff can record data at regular intervals and be alerted if the conditions exceed an acceptable range.

Wireless technology not only improves efficiency, but it also saves time and money. Talk to us today about incorporating wireless equipment into your healthcare facility.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

December 3rd, 2014

GeneralHealthIT_Dec03_AYou may not want to rely on the Food & Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) app approval system: Roughly 90 percent of Android health-care apps have been hacked, and 22 percent of them were FDA-approved. That information comes from the latest State of Mobile App Security report from Arxan Technologies, which attributed the high rate to a lack of information, security training and resources in the health-care field.

Of health-care apps, none that were Apple iOS-based have been hacked. But, looking at all apps, the risk is close between Android and iOS. Looking at the top 100 paid apps, 97 percent of those that are Android-based have been hacked, and 87 percent of those that are iOS-based have been hacked.

Because health-care apps tend to hold confidential patient information, these breaches present serious risk. “Make application self-protection a new investment priority, ahead of perimeter and infrastructure protection,” says Joseph Feiman in a Gartner Maverick Research report, “Stop Protecting Your Apps; It’s Time for Apps to Protect Themselves.”

Click here for an infographic that shows the state of app security, and contact us if you are looking to make sure that your apps are secure.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

November 3rd, 2014

HealthcareIT_Nov03_AMedical Group Management Association (MGMA) 2014 annual conference attendees were fortunate to get some tips for improving patient satisfaction from Joan Hablutzel, senior industry analyst with the MGMA—because doing so is essential to the success of a medical practice in an increasingly competitive health-care marketplace. Here are 10 of them.

  1. Say hello and smile when patients arrive to acknowledge their presence.
  2. Answer the phone in three rings with a consistent greeting to show the practice views the patient as an individual.
  3. Show empathy in your communication with the patient by observing his or her mannerisms and responding in kind.
  4. Explain what is going to happen, whether it’s a process or a procedure.
  5. Don’t interrupt when a patient is talking.
  6. Look for signs that a patient is dissatisfied or concerned—and when you hear concerns, don’t ever leave it at “I don’t know.” Find someone who does.
  7. Always respect patient confidentiality.
  8. Live up to your promises. Set time estimates and update patients if they change, apologizing when necessary.
  9. Say goodbye and wish the patient well upon departure to affirm respect.
These steps may be simple, says Hablutzel, but implementing them can truly transform the way staff members interact with patients, boosting their perception of your practice and driving growth. Contact us today to see how our systems can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

October 3rd, 2014

Genhealth_Oct02_AFor the first time ever, achieving meaningful use depends on patient behavior: Meaningful use Stage 2 requires at least 5 percent of a health-care provider's patients to be engaged in their own care— either through an electronic medical record (EMR) or an online portal.

The push for patient engagement is understandable, if data provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is accurate. According to the foundation, patients who are not engaged in their own health care can cost 21 percent more than patients who are highly engaged.

But, many health-care providers are worried about the patient engagement requirement, and for good reason: To some extent patient engagement is out of the physician’s control. But it doesn’t have to be, with good communication, both in the office and via electronic followup.

The first step is letting your patients know you have an online portal, which they may not be aware of. According to a survey from Technology Advice, a consulting firm, 40 percent of people who saw a primary-care physician within the last year didn’t even know if the physician offered a portal.

Keep in mind, however, that you may want to do more than create and communicate about a patient portal. By creating a vehicle that connects all stakeholders across the health-care continuum—patients and physicians alike—you truly elevate the patient experience.

If you are looking for help meeting these requirements, contact us today to learn how our systems and experts can support your practice.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 5th, 2014

HealthcareIT_Sep03_A

As of June 30, 2014, more than 1,000 data breaches affecting more than 500 patients each have been reported to the Department of Health & Human Services - for a total of roughly 32,000,000 people who have had their privacy compromised. And, according to the annual Redspin Breach Report, published in February of 2014, 7.1 million patient records were breached in 2013, a 137.7% increase over 2012.

And, the threat is getting broader. Once caused primarily by snooping or negligent employees, data breaches are now increasingly caused by cybercriminals who realize the potential financial value of medical records. Case in point: The Chinese hacker attack on the 206-hospital Community Health Systems which resulted in the breach of 4.5 million patient records, the second-largest HIPAA breach ever reported.

No physician practice should consider itself immune. While large hospital systems may be most attractive to hackers, Eric Perakslis, executive director of Harvard Medical School's Center for Biomedical Informatics, recently wrote in a New England Journal of Medicine article that 72 percent of cyberattacks have been aimed at hospitals, group practices and other provider organizations.

Perakslis recommends an "active learning approach” that involves real-time surveillance of emerging threats - and that includes an intimate knowledge of one's own network and vigilance at one's own practice. One of the most effective ways you can do this is to work with a company like ours who can help not only ensure security of your systems but also help teach you and your staff about common security issues.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

August 5th, 2014

HealthIT_Aug05_AAs we move toward the October 2015 compliance deadline for ICD-10, the Journal of AHIMA has tackled three misconceptions about the new coding system.

ICD-9 isn't so bad. In reality, ICD-9 is obsolete, and the longer it is in use, the more the quality of health-care data will decline, leading to faulty decisions based on inaccurate or imprecise data. This could lead to increased operating costs along with mistakes which could have a negative effect on your practice and overall billings.

More codes create confusion and difficulty. Almost half of the new codes reflect the ability to differentiate one side of a patient's body from the other. Moreover, more codes, which are more precise, will in fact make it easier to find the right code. It's true that it will take time to learn the new codes, but in the long-run you should see overall efficiency increase, along with more accurate medical records which will make your job easier.

We could just use SNOMED CT or move right to ICD-11. Terminologies such as SNOMED and classification systems such as ICD-10 different roles—albeit complementary ones. And, ICD-11 won’t be ready for prime time until 2017, and that dates marks the beginning, not the end, of the process toward adoption. Remember, ICD-10 was first used by World Health Organization members 1994—and 10 year’s later it’s just going live on a widespread basis.

If you would like to learn more about ICD-10 and how you can ensure that your practice is ready for the October 2015 deadline, contact us today to learn how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

July 3rd, 2014

HealthcareIT_July03_AThe compliance date for ICD-10 is farther away than it once was, but it’s still coming — and health-care practitioners should be moving forward with preparedness plans, if the results of a recent survey are any indication.

The survey — which questioned physician practices, hospitals, payers, vendors, and others — was conducted by eHealth Initiative and the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).

It found that most health-care organizations are using the extra time afforded by the delay of ICD-10 compliance to October 15 to invest, train, and test. Most organizations said they're ready for testing, but some are more prepared than others. Around 40 percent of respondents said they'd start end-to- end testing by the end of 2014, and 25 percent reported that they’d begin by the end of 2015. And, to minimize productivity loss, 68 percent of respondents said they will conduct additional training, with 31 percent hiring more coders to help with the transition.

Concerns about ICD-10 remain, however. One pertains to preparedness, with 45 percent of respondents reporting that they don't have a good sense of their partners' readiness. Another pertains to financial impact, with 38 percent of respondents saying they thought their revenue will decrease, and 14 percent saying they think it will stay the same. Only 6 percent think it will increase.

Clearly, while the ICD-10 transition seeks to improve accuracy of claims and quality of care, not everyone has a clear plan to derive value from it. But now, it seems, is the best time to prepare. We recommend that you contact us today to learn more about how we can help ensure that you are ready for ICD-10.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

June 5th, 2014

HealthcareIT_June06_ANot all clouds are created equal, at least when it comes to encryption. Most cloud providers say they encrypt data, which engenders a sense of security—but there is a weakness in the process. Data —say, a medical record— is indeed encrypted when you send it to the cloud. But, when it arrives at the server to be stored, it’s decrypted.

The question then becomes not if your data is encrypted, but how well it is encrypted. Consider a picture sent from one place to another using an industry-standard 256-bit AES algorithm. Anyone with some expertise and a good computer can probably see enough of that picture to make out what it is. So, ideally, you want a cloud provider to offer multi-level encryption, better than a 256-bit AES algorithm.

Additionally, there should be administrative features in place that allow you or other IT staff to see when files have been viewed and edited, how, and by whom.

If you add client-side encryption to these features, you have a winning combination: the ability to store a safely encrypted document directly with a patient, leading to better engagement and thus, a potentially more profitable business.

Contact us today to learn more about our secure options and how they can help ensure your data is secure.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.